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The Children's Own Books 



VOL. I 
VOL. II 
VOL. Ill 
VOL. IV 
VOL. V 
VOL. VI 
VOL. VII 
VOL. VIII 
VOL. IX 
VOL. X 
VOL. XI 
VOL. XII 
VOL. XIII 
VOL. XIV 



PETER RABBIT. 
DICK WHITTINGTON. 

LITTLE BLACK SAMBO 
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN— TOPSY. 

THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS. 
MOTHER GOOSE RHYMES. 

BLACK BEAUTY. 

THE LITTLE LAME PRINCE. 

RAB AND HIS FRIENDS. 
J. COLE. 

THE ADVENTURES OF A BROWNIE. 
SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD. 
SLEEPING BEAUTY. 

CINDERELLA. 

TH L THREE BEARS. 

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK. 
ROBINSON CRUSOE. 

ALICE IN WONDERLAND. 
THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS. 

THE UGLY DUCKLING (Andersen). 
RIP VAN WINKLE. 

HANSEL AND GRETEL (Grimm). 
SNOW WHITE AND ROSE RED. 

r ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP, 
^ ROBIN HOOD. 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL, 
i JESSICA'S FIRST PRAYER. 





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The Reilly & Lee Co. 
Chicago 



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THE STORY OF 
LITTLE BLACK SAMBO 



y^^NCE upon a time there was a little 
^-^ black boy, and his name was Little 
Black Sambo. 

And his Mother was called Black 
Mumbo. 

And his Father was called Black Jumbo. 

And Black Mumbo made him a beauti- 
f ul little Red Coat and a pair of beautiful 
little Blue Trousers. 

13 



Little Black Sambo 



And Black Jumbo went to the Bazaar 
and bought him a beautiful Green Um- 
brella and a lovely little Pair of Purple 
Shoes with Crimson Soles and Crimson 
Linings. 

And then wasn't Little Black Sambo 
grand? 

So he put on all his fine clothes and went 

out for a walk in the Jungle. And by 

and by he met a Tiger. And the Tiger 

said to him, ''Little Black Sambo, I'm 

going to eat you up I" 

And Little Black Sambo said, ''Oh! 
u 



Little Black Sambo 

Please, Mr. Tiger, don't eat me up, and Til 
give you my beautiful little Red Coat/' 
So the Tiger said, '*Very well, I won't eat 
you this time, but you must give me your 
beautiful little Red Coat." So the Tiger 
got poor Little Black Sambo's beautiful 
little Red Coat, and went away saying, 
"Now I'm the grandest Tiger in the Jun- 
gle." 

And Little Black Sambo went on, and 
by and by he met another Tiger, and it 
said to him, "Little Black Sambo, I'm 
going to eat you up!" And Little Black 

16 



Little Black Sambo 

Sambo said, ''Oh! Please, Mr. Tiger, don't 
eat me up, and I'll give you my beautiful 
little Blue Trousers." So the Tiger said, 
' -Very well, I won't eat you this time, but 
you must give me your beautiful little 
Blue Trousers." So the Tiger got poor 
Little Black Sambo's beautiful little Blue 
Trousers, and went away saying, ''Now 
I'm the grandest Tiger in the Jungle." 

And Little Black Sambo went on, and 
by and by he met another Tiger, and it said 
to him, "Little Black Sambo, I'm going to 
eat you up!" And Little Black Sambo 

17 



Little Black Sambo 

said, ''Oh! Please, Mr. Tiger, acn t eat 
me up, and I'll give you my beautiful lit- 
tle Purple Shoes with Crimson Soles and 
Crimson Linings." 

But the Tiger said, *'What use would 
your shoes be to me? I've got four feet, 
and you've got only two; you haven't got 
enough shoes for me." 

But Little Black Sambo said, ''You 
could wear them on your ears." 

"So I could," said the Tiger; "that's 
a very good idea. Give them to me, and I 
won't eat you this time." 

20 



Little Black Sambo 

So the Tiger got poor Little Black Sam- 
bo's beautiful little Purple Shoes with 
Crimson Soles and Crimson Linings, and 
went away saying, "Now I'm the grandest 
Tiger in the Jungle." 

And by and by Little Black Sambo met 
another Tiger, and it said to him, ''Little 
Black Sambo, I'm going to eat you up!" 
And Little Black Sambo said, ''Oh, Please, 
Mr. Tiger, don't eat me up, and I'll give 
you my beautiful Green Umbrella." But 
the Tiger said, "How can I carry an um- 
brella, when I need all my paws for walk- 
ing with?" 

31 



Little Black Sambo 

''You could tie a knot in your tail, and 
carry it that way," said Little Black 
Sambo. ''So I could," said the Tiger. 
''Give it to me, and I won't eat you this 
time," So he got poor Little Black 
Sambo's beautiful Green Umbrella, and 
went away saying, ''Now I'm the grandest 
Tiger in the Jungle." 

And poor Little Black Sambo went 
away crying, because the cruel Tigers had 
taken all his fine clothes. 

Presently he heard a horrible noise that 
sounded like "Gr-r-r-r-rrrrrrr," and it got 



Little Black Sambo 

louder and louder, ''Oh, dear!" said Little 
Black Sambo, "there are all the Tigers 
coming back to eat me up I What shall I 
do?" So he ran quickly to a palm-tree and 
peeped round it to see what the matter 
was. 

And there he saw all the Tigers fighting 
and disputing which of them was the 
grandest. And at last they all got so angry 
that they jumped up and took off all the 
fine clothes and began to tear each other 
with their claws, and bite each other with 
their great big white teeth. 

24 



Liittle Black Sambo 

And they came, rolling and tumbling 
right to the foot of the very tree where 
Little Black Sambo was hiding, but he 
jumped quickly in behind the umbrella. 
And the Tigers all caught hold of each 
others tails as they wrangled and scram- 
bled, and so they found themselves in a 
ring around the tree. 

Then, when he was quite a little dis- 
tance away from the Tigers, Little Black 
Sambo jumped up and called out, "Oh! 
Tigers, why have you taken oiff all your 
nice clothes?' Don't you want them any 

25 



Little Black Sambo 

more?" But the Tigers only answered, 
*'Gr-r-rrrrrr!" 

Then Little Black Sambo said, 'If you 
want them, say so, or I'll take them away." 
But the Tigers would not let go of each 
others' tails, and so they could only say 
*'Gr-r-r-rrrrrrrr!" 

So Little Black Sambo put on all his fine 
clothes again and walked off. 

And the Tigers were very, very angry, 
but still they would not let go of each 
others' tails. And they were so angry that 
they ran round the tree, trying to eat each 



Little Black Sambo 

other up, and they ran faster and faster, 
till they were whirling round so fast that 
you couldn't see their legs at all. 

And still they ran faster and faster and 
faster, till they all just melted away, and 
there was nothing left but a great big pool 
of melted butter (or ''ghi," as it is called 
in India) round the foot of the tree. 

Now Black Jumbo was just coming 
home from his work,' with a great big brass 
pot in his arms, and when he saw what 
was left of all the Tigers he said, ''Oh! 
what lovely melted butter ! I'll take that 

3P 



Little Black Sambo 

home to Black Mumbo for her to cook 
with." 

So he put it all into the great big brass 
pot and took it home to Black Mumbo to 
cook with. 

When Black Mumbo saw the melted 
butter, wasn't she pleased! ''Now," said 
she, "we'll all have pancakes for supper!" 

So she got flour and eggs and milk and 
sugar and butter, and she made a huge big 
plate of most lovely pancakes. And she 
fried them in the melted butter which the 
Tigers had made, and they were just as 
yellow and brown as little Tigers. 

30 



Little Black Sambo 

And then they all sat down to supper. 
And Black Mumbo ate Twenty-seven pan- 
cakes, and Black Jumbo ate Fifty-five, but 
Little Black Sambo ate a Hundred and 
Sixty nine, because he was so hungry. 



TOPSY 



Ti >T ANY years ago, when negroes were 
^ -^ slaves and were bought and sold 
the same as horses, cows, chickens or ducks, 
Mr. Augustine St. Clare, while saur/Lcring 
about the market place, came upon the 
blackest little pickaninny girl he had ever 
seen. She was eight or nine years old, 
and, besides being very black, had round 
shining eyes, glittering as glass beads, and 



37 



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woolly hair braided into little tails, which 
stuck out in every direction. She was 
dressed in a filthy, ragged garment and was 
quite the most woebegone little darkey 
ever seen by Mr. St. Clare. Perhaps in a 
spirit of compassion and partly as a joke 
he bought her and took her home. Her 
name was Topsy, and when children are 
old enough they may read all about her in 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," a book that had 
much to do with freeing the slaves; a sad, 
sad story, indeed; as sad as Topsy, ignor- 
ant and care-free, was joyful and mis- 
chievous. 

40 



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The very sight of the scrawny black girl 
caused Miss Ophelia, Mr. St. Clare's cou- 
sin, to throw up her hands in amazement, 

**What is it!" she exclaimed. 

'Tve made a purchase for you," said he, 
with a grin, looking first at Topsy, whose 
eyes were bulging wide open at the sight of 
the fine furniture, and then at his cousin, 
who had folded her hands in despair. 

"Augustine, what in the world did you 
bring her here for?" protested Miss 
Ophelia. 

"For you to educate, to be sure," he re- 
plied, laughingly. 

41 



1 o p s y 

"I thought her a funny little Jim Crow 
and I bought her. Here, Topsy," he 
added, whistling as one would call the at- 
tention of a puppy dog, 'give us a song 
and show Miss Ophelia how well you can 
dance." 

Topsy's eyes glittered with a kind of 
wicked drollery, and then, in a clear, shrill 
voice, she struck up an old negro melody, 
to which she kept time with her hands and 
feet, spinning round, clapping her hands, 
knocking her knees together and shuffling 
her feet. Finally, she turned two somer- 
saults in front of Miss Ophelia so close 



1 o p s y 

that she almost took the good lady's breath 
away with amazement. 

"Topsy, this is your new mistress," said 
Mr. St. Clare, solemnly. 

"O yes, mas'r," replied Topsy, with 
another twinkle. 

For poor Miss Ophelia, already bur- 
dened with the care of a lot of little blacks, 
it was hard to understand why fate had 
brought this imp of darkness into her life. 

But, being a good Christian woman, she 
bowed to the inevitable and promised to 
do her best with the child. 

44 



"How old are you, Topsy?' she asked, 
kindly. 

'*Dunno, missis," said Topsy, showing 
all her white teeth. 

''Didn't anybody ever tell you? Who 
was your mother?" 

"Nevah had none!" answered the child 
with another grin. 

''Never had a mother? Why, Topsy, 
what do you mean? Where were you 
born?" 

"Nevah was born!" replied the little 
imp, still grinning, and all the questions 



45 



1 o p s y 

Miss Ophelia could bring to bear failed to 
make the child own that she ever had a 
mother or had ever been born. 

"Have you ever heard about God, 
Topsy?" asked Miss Ophelia, but the 
child had no answer. She didn't know 
what the good lady meant. 

*'Do you know who made you?" 

''Nobody, as 1 know on," replied the 
child; "I 'spect I jest growed." 

The poor child knew nothing but how 
to ''fetch" water, wash dishes and rub 
knives, so she told Miss Ophelia, and 

48 



1 o p s y 

afterward, when caught stealing, she 
didn't even know it was wrong to steal. 
When compelled to confess, she told of 
stealing things that she never stole at all, 
explaining that "Missis told me to 'fess 
and I couldn't think o' no thin' else to 
'fess." So she told of stealing earrings 
and burning them up, when, as a matter of 
fact, little Eva St. Clare had them in her 
ears at the time. 

There was something in the black child 
that touched the kindly heart of little Eva, 
who, though but a child herself, had, by 

49 



reason of long illness, grown old beyond 
her years. 

"Poor Topsy," she said kindly, "you 
need never steal again. You are to be 
taken care of now. I'd give you anything 
of mine rather than have you steal it." 

It almost seemed as though the black 
child understood the bond of sympathy 
held out to her, but she could only blink 
and rub her eyes. It was the first kindly 
word she had ever understood and it 
caused a queer feeling in her heart. Being 
pure and gentle herself, Eva soon exer- 



50 



1 o p s y 

cised an influence on little black Topsy 
that changed her into a rare jewel. 

Being smart and active she soon learned 
the ways of negroes of the better class. 
Of course, she would have to play at times 
and did some very silly things, like pulling 
off the pillow-cases and butting at the pil- 
lows with her woolly head, and sometimes 
feathers would creep through and stick in 
her crinkled hair. And she would dress 
the bolster up in Miss Ophelia's night 
clothes and, when scolded, would ask to be 

53 



"whipped like old missis allers whipped 
me," a thing Miss Ophelia could not bring 
herself to do. 

As in all cases where once a person has 
been caught stealing, there is a lurking sus- 
picion against them. So it was with 
Topsy, who, when little Eva was slowly 
passing from this world, used to pick flow- 
ers and take them to Eva's bedside. 

One day she was caught, and not until 
Eva herself informed the captors that she 
had told Topsy to pick the flowers and 



53 



bring them to her was the little black girl 
released. The next time suspicion fell on 
the child was after Eva's sad end, and the 
little darkey was seen to hide something 
quickly in the bosom of her dress as some 
one approached. "What do you suppose 
was hidden ? A curl from little Eva's hair 
and a tiny Bible — both had been given 
Topsy by the little white girl before her 
death. After this episode Topsy became 
the special favorite of Mr. St. Clare, who 
declared that the child must never again 



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be molested. Strange to say, when Topsy 
grew up she became a teacher in far-away 
Africa, among people of her own kind and 
color. 



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o You Know the Oz Books 




THERE are now eighteen of these wonderful 
stories of the Fairyland of Oz. Full of ad- 
ventures, fun, and queer, delightful characters. 

The Famous Oz Books 

The Land of Oz 

Ozma of Oz 

Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz 

The Road to Oz 

The Elmerald City of Oz 

The Patchwork Girl of Oz 

Tik-Tok of Oz 

The Scarecrow of Oz 

Rinkitink in Oz 

The Lost Princess of Oz 

The Tin Woodman of Oz 

The Magic of Oz 

Glinda of Oz 

The Royal Book of Oz 

Kabumpo in Oz 

The Cowardly Lion of Oz 

Grampa in Oz . 

The Lost King of Oz 





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